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's apparently wrapped up talk in cairo with president morsi, who this time yesterday was saying a truce, at least a cease-fire of some sorts, was just hours, hours away. let's go to tel aviv. sara sidner is standing by. tell our viewers what happened just a few hours ago. >> reporter: around noon, tel aviv time, there was an explosion on the number 61 bus. it was very close to the military headquarters here, very close to the courts here, along a street that was eventually block off by police. at least 22 people were injured, some of those people were on the bus, some outside the bus. they suffered everything from panic attacks to a couple teenagers who have the worst of the injuries. we talked to the e.r. doctor who told us one of the teenagers may lose a limb, perhaps an arm because of the soft tissue that's been blasted away. also a lot of shrapnel wounds in the face. both may face a lifetime of disability. those are his words. we talked to the police, more still looking for a suspect, trying to find out who was responsible. we saw the bus before testify driven away. all the windows
's in cairo and meeting with the egyptian president mohammed morsi who has emerged as a key player in the effort to try to end the fighting between israel and hamas. but mr. morsi walking a very tight political and social, for that matter, tight rope. reza sayah joining us from cairo. reza, morsi playing a pivot on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking o
pictures now. cairo, egypt, tahrir square. and thousands of people are refusing to go home. they are angry at their president. they say he's made himself a dictator. it's quiet now in cairo. it's just after 2:00 a.m., but it definitely was not quiet earlier in the day. listen. tear gas filled the air and crowds of protesters scattered when riot police tried to break up the protests in cairo. we have reports of demonstrators trying to break into the offices of the president's party, the muslim brotherhood. and at least one person reportedly died today in the street violence, a teenager. cnn's reza sayah spent much of the day right in the middle of the chaos in cairo. >> we keep seeing these clashes between protesters and police, protesters throwing rocks at police. police responding by firing tear gas and stun grenades. we're just a few blocks away from tahrir square. we should point out most of these protesters are young men, 20-something, teenagers, hard to say if they're here fighting for democracy or here to cause some trouble. those were chants of down with president mo
. [ gunfire ] secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister announced the deal in cairo after the secretary spent the day in intense face-to-face talks with the leaders of israel, the palestinian authority and egypt. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership it has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> we're still learning details of the agreement between the israelis and hamas. egypt and the united states apparently have assumed important major roles in keeping the peace and preventing new supplies of rockets from being smuggled into gaza. president obama spoke by phone today with the leaders of both egypt and israel. >> translator: i have agreed with the president that israel and the united states would work together to prevent the smuggling of arms to the terror organizations. the vast majority of which comes from iran. >> throughout this crisis cnn has positioned crews throughout the region including correspondents in egypt and on both sides of the israeli/gaza
tear gassed protesters in cairo's tahrir square. angry demonstrators packed the square today denouncing egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look at cairo today, it doesn't seem like it. the demonstrations are continuing. so are clashes. about an hour and a half ago clashes taking place right where we are behind us at the hotel we're staying at. security forces clashing with protesters. a number of protesters ambushed a police vehicle carrying riot police. the police took off. the protesters got ahold of this truck, set it on fire. more security forces came in, shot tear gas and disbursed the protesters. we've seen similar clashes throughout the day. all
. >>> and now to egypt. demonstrators there have taken to the streets in cairo to protest against president mohamed morsi. morsi expanded his powers this week, and that means no one can challenge his decisions. they can't be overturned. that's led to anger among the people and some of the judges. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo this morning. >> reporter: thanks have calmed down considerably in cairo's tahrir square. still demonstrators out in tahrir, especially those who pitched tents overnight but the numbers not as what we saw on friday, friday one of the most intense and violent days of demonstrations that we've seen since mr. morsi, the egyptian president took office back in june. more than 140 people injured throughout egypt, according to the health ministry, in clashes between protesters and police. a little under 40 people injured in kay row. several with gunshot wounds. also, more than 200 people arrested and many on charges of thuggery and destroying public property. those arrested seem to be younger men who are out looking for trouble, but certainly thousands showed up to express wha
of the possibility of a cease-fire. hamas officials say, in fact, it would have been announced hours ago in cairo. clearly, that's not happening. there's no sign of a cease-fire. in fact, certainly, if you look -- if we go back over the last few hours, five or six hours, it's been an evening of fairly intense fire, not only incoming israeli air strikes, but just a little while ago, we saw two rockets being launched also from this area behind me. and certainly by the looks of those rockets, and we're getting very good at recognizing them, some of them do appear to be these so-called 5 rockets, which have a fairly long range, rockets fired in the direction of tel aviv and jerusalem. also today, one of those rockets falling to the south near the settlement block in the west bank. and another building, an israeli building a town outside tel aviv on the road to jerusalem. so we've seen a fairly intense evening, certainly, of violence here, incoming, as well as outgoing. and all this talk about a ceasefire and discussions in cairo and elsewhere don't seem to be amounting to much at this time. now, toda
get can caught up on the day's headlines right now. you are looking at live pictures from cairo. where anti-government protesters are spending the night in tahrir square. they are protesting morsi's decree granting himself unchecked political power. earlier today, protesters threw rocks at police who responded with tear gas, we will have more on this story at the bottom of the hour. and an emergency at the u.s. state department today, fire trucks raced to the department headquarters before noon, a flash fire in the duct work of the building forced everyone to evacuate and sent three people in the hospital, construction workers were among the few in the building because it's a holiday weekend. a gas explosion that damaged more than 40 buildings. a camera captured the moment of the blast. mostly emergency workers were injured. they were called to the scene because of reports of the gas smell. they evacuated most of the area an hour before the explosion. superstorm sandy is at $29 billion at cost. governor chris christie said that the final total will only be known after taking into accou
prime minister benjamin netanyahu before jetting to cairo for talks with the president of egypt, mohammad morsi. the urgency underscored by the carnage in benghazi. rockets are lobbying back and forth. israeli air attacks killing 27 more palestinians bringing the death toll to 137 just in the last week. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and his foreign minister lieberman didn't see eye to eye with the defense minister who was
, but they have a relationship with the egyptians. there have been israeli envoys that have gone to cairo to meet with high-ranking egyptian officials. trying to broker a deal. no trust, hamas has to trust for the israelis and israelis have no trust for the hamas. there have been a lot of rockets and missiles coming from gaza into israeli and the israeli air strikes pounded away at targets in garz. a lot of casualties. there's no goodwill on the part of either of these, they don't trust each other. having said that, looks like they're close. hamas seems to think within the next hour or two some agreement will be announced, thanks to the egyptians. but i spoke with the israeli government spokesman for the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu in the past hour, he said there's no deal yet. he didn't rule out there wouldn't be a deal but he said there's no deal yet. until all of the is are dotted, t richardson cros are crossed. until there's a deal, there's no deal, as they like to say, the diplomatic community. >> we also know the president, president obama, has called and talked to the preside
senior hamas official who said that at 9:00 p.m. cairo time, 10:00 p.m. eastern standard time, that there would be an announcement in cairo, by an official, from the egyptian government and from hamas, announcing some sort of agreement for at least a temporary cease-fire. however, we're hearing from other hamas officials that israel has yet to agree to this proposed cease-fire and the israelis are saying there is nothing as of yet. but the idea is rather than send out broad guidelines for a period of peace and calm, they just want to see if both sides can keep the peace. now, one of the concerns here is that it is not just hamas who is operating in gaza, there are other groups like islamic jihad, affiliated with iran, even smaller splinter groups out there that hamas doesn't necessarily control completely. and therefore that's why they want to give this -- this initial period to see if the peace can indeed or quiet or calm can hold. >> ben, in terms of the entire region, and we're standing sort of by a map which i want to show our viewers, this and is of israel, you've got the
rescind a decree that gives him unlimited power. we get more now from cairo. >> reporter: outrage, clashes, and anguish in tahrir. thousands of angry egyptians back in a public square that has become the arab world's emblem for the democratic right to protest. this was where egyptians demanded the ouster of former president hosni mubarak last year. this time, the fury aimed at current president mohamed morsi. >> we're here because we don't want him to rule us anymore. >> it's a one-man show. he wants to do everything. this is nothing at all what we want. >> reporter: on thursday, the new islamist president made himself the most powerful man in egypt by announcing sweeping decrees he says are designed to push forward the drafting of egypt's new constitution and speed up the formation of a government that still is missing a parliament. >> whether it causes anyone to overturn any of the declarations. that's the same place the parliament is born. technically, it means for now he can do whatever he wants without any oversight. >> i felt he was telling us, you guys don't exist. it's just me and
are the greatest defender of the arab cause, which is the palestinian cause. and it works. go to cairo, to the shops of cairo, and you will see photographs of ahmadinejad, an iranian leader. why? because he stands up for the palestinians. that's the game the iranians play, and my guess is the more horrible the pictures are out of gaza the more there is a sense of this massive drift of power between israel and the palestinians. the more iran will be seen as one of the few countries that is willing to really stand up and speak against the west and, you know, they have, as you know, very colorful rhetoric, but that's all geared towards this regional gain where they're almost outwitting the arab against the palestinians. >> let me veer off to israel for a moment. benjamin netanyahu is up for reelection soon. how much do you think what's happening now, this rousing with gaza, does or doesn't have anything to do with him? >> we have to hope this has nothing to do with that because this is a very serious business. not only is he taking his own country into a military operation, he is risking
the border. first i want to go to cairo and reza sayah who's following all the developments there. just a few moments ago, morsi spoke to a huge crowd. what did he say? >> well, he tried to calm things down. he defended his position. he defended the controversial decrees he announced last night telling his opponents that he's part of the revolution, one of the people. certainly at this hour he's got a lot of opponents and critics who do not agree with him and are are expressing their outrage in the streets. dramatic scenes in cairo. very reminiscent of the scenes we saw during the 2011 egyptian revolution. back then it was aimed at former president hosni mubarak. now aimed at mr. morsi. there were some clashes during the protest in tahrir square that are ongoing. the clashes witnesses say were caused by protesters that threw rocks at security forces. the security forces responded by firing tear gas. and back and forth went this cat and mouse game that has been emblematic of these protests. the outranl comes after the decrees last night that many critics are describing as a power grab. one of
on the young democracy. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo this morning. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, carol. new developments today in tie cairo that could further entangle and muddy what is an already complicated conflict. we have confirmed that next week on december 4th a court in cairo will hear several cases brought against the controversial decrees declared by mr. morsi last week. here's where the intrigue comes in. last week one of his decrees banned anyone, any authority, even the judiciary from questioning and overturning any of his decisions since he took office. we'll see how that plays out. meantime protests continue. there doesn't seem to be a resolution to this conflict. the leaders of the opposition factions have dug in saying we're not going to have dialogue until mr. morsi rescinds his decrees. a few hours ago we spoke to one of his top advisers and we asked him, is that a possibility? >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make. >> this decision is up to the president, not for us. >> is it possible -- is it possible he will rescind his decrees. >> dialogue wi
east. will that happen? we're going back live to gaza. we're going to cairo, we're going to israel. all of that right here in "the situation room." nd? ♪ announcing the all-new 2013 malibu from chevrolet. ♪ with a remarkable new interior featuring the available chevrolet mylink infotainment system. this is where sophisticated styling begins. and where it ends? that's up to you. it's here -- the greatest malibu ever. ♪ is what drives us to broadcast the world's biggest events in 3d, or live to your seat high above the atlantic ocean. it's what drives us to create eco-friendly race tracks, batteries that power tomo's cars, and the sustainable smart towns of the future. at panasonic, we're driven to make what matters most better. just another way we're engineering a better world for you. yeah, i might have ears like a rabbit... but i want to eat meat! [ male announcer ] iams knows dogs love meat. ...but most dry foods add plant protein, like gluten iams never adds gluten. iams adds 50% more animal protein, [ dog 2 ] look at me! i'm a lean, mean flying machine [ dog 1 ] i am too! woo
. in cairo's tahrir square, thousands are chanting for regime change. they say egypt's new president is acting like a dictator. president mohamed morsi granted himself sweeping new powers yesterday, basically morsi now has absolute power for six months. his opponents say he's acting like a new pharaoh. the u.s. state department is calling for calm and encouraging all parties to work together. morsi declared all his laws, all his decrees are final and cannot be overturned or appealed until egypt's new constitution is put in place. just days ago, people around the world were praising morsi for his pivotal role in negotiating the israel/hamas cease-fire. today, protesters set fire to a symbol of morsi's power, the muslim brotherhood headquarters in alexandria, egypt. morsi supporters clashed with protesters there. morsi is defending his new powers, saying he's not taking sides and the steps he took are meant to achieve political and social stability. reza sayah joins us live in cairo. reza, is morsi's government strong enough, so early in this administration, to withstand this level of
by the u.s. embassy in cairo and evolved into a direct assault against the u.s. diplomatic post in benghazi and subsequently its annex. the white house edit didn't even make it into the final version. we invited congressman king and he declined due to a scheduling conflict and tonight there's another development on the talking points. senior congressional correspondent dana bash joins me tonight. does he seem to be pointing a finger necessarily at the white house now, and he does think the talking points are aerlted, is that right? >> he does still think they've been altered and it turns out that today it does appear to be right, anderson. pam benson was told that the original draft of the unclassified talking points to be sent to the intelligence committee did suggest that the benghazi attack had links to al qaeda. it was taken out, but the senior official with knowledge of this process says it was not taken out by the white house and it wasn't a white house decision, but a joint interagency decision. they decided to tone it down and they replaced it with the term extremists and the reason
with the leader of hamas in cairo and asked him about the attack. >> i'm asking you, did hamas claim responsibility? did hamas do that? >> translator: not hamas, not other people, not hamas. no one can announce except those who commit it, not me. the building lesson is what matters. who committed the circumstances that led to this operation. it is netanyahu with his crimes in killing the kids of gaza. and he creates such ramifications everywhere. this could lead to any kind of reaction as retaliation for what happened in gaza. >> our reporters in gaza city said when that -- when the bombing was announced from loud speakers in hamas, there was celebratory gunfire in gaza city. i spoke to christianne amanpour about her interview. >> you pressed on whether they would ever recognize israel. he gave a lot of talking points. this is finally what he to say. let's listen. >> you say you would accept a two-state solution but won't recognize israel's right to exist. >> i accept the state of the 1967. how can i accept israel? they have occupied my land. i need recognition, not the israelis. th
said this evening in cairo at the press conference. that they have to meet the aspirations, we need seriousness in approaching this way of solving the conflict. >> thank you very much for joining me. >>> she joins me when we come back. [ male announcer ] can a car be built around a state of mind? ♪ announcing the all-new 2013 malibu from chevrolet. ♪ with a remarkable new interior featuring the available chevrolet mylink infotainment system. this is where sophisticated styling begins. and where it ends? that's up to you. it's here -- the greatest malibu ever. ♪ that bringing you better technology helps make you a better investor. with our revolutionary e-trade 360 dashboard you see exactly where your money is and what it's doing live. our e-trade pro platform offers powerful functionality that's still so usable you'll actually use it. and our mobile apps are the ultimate in wherever whenever investing. no matter what kind of investor you are, you'll find the technology to help you become a better one at e-trade. we find the best, sweetest craforelobste that we can find. [ male
supporters and police if cairo. and egypt's highest judicial body called on morsy to stay out of all judicial matters. >>> life is returning to normal in gaza three days after hamas militants and israel agreed to stop fighting. children returned to school today. despite a shooting near the border yesterday that reportedly left one palestinian dead, the cease-fire is holding. the next phase of the truce, talks on potentially easing israel's blockade in gaza and opening border crossings. the hope is this cease-fire will hold. joining us right now is a man who knows the area quite well, edward dejarian is the former u.s. ambassador to both israel and syria. he helped establish the james baker institute for public policy at rice university in houston. ambassador, good to see you. >> good to see you. >> so how confident are you about this truce thus far? >> so far, i think it's holding. and that's obviously a good sign. there have been minor violations. but the important thing is to build on this truce. in every crisis i think there is an opportunity. and if the truce is just to become a prolonged
of that video in cairo and elsewhere. >> usually they do put the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. out before the big general assembly meetings which were about to begin. >> reporter: great point. >> that's probably one of the reasons they selected her as well. that's at least what i've been told by insiders. dana, thanks very much. >>> we're now only 35 days away from the so-called fiscal cliff. deep cuts in federal spending coupled with sharp tax increases by law they take effect automatically and many experts fear will throw the u.s. economy back into a recession. both congress and the white house are trying to make a deficit reduction deal to avoid the financial chaos. and president obama's reverting to some campaign mode right now to try to make sure things are done his way. our white house correspondent dan lothian is joining us now with new information. what are you learning, dan? >> reporter: well, wolf, while senior members of the administration including secretary geithner, chief of staff jack lou also top advisor meeting with -- the president himself trying to sell his vision to the public
. >>> tear gas in cairo near the u.s. embassy as the fight for democracy goes on. >> face to face. susan rice and john mccain, the man who wanted watergate style hearings, meet. and only cnn catches up with mccain before the big meeting. >> what do you have to learn today from miss rice? >> whatever ambassador rice wants to tell me. she's the one who asked for the meeting. i didn't. >> wouldn't you like to be a fly on the wall? >>> spyfall, real-life bond movie. yasser arafat's body was exhumed. was the palestinian leader po h poisoned by israeli spies? >>> plus this. >> you said walden is in trouble. >> i'm the trouble walden has been in, repeatedly. >> he calls it filth, the half in "two and a half men" begs you not to watch his show. "newsroom" starts now. >>> good morning to you. thank you so much for being with us. i'm carol costello. we begin with a high stakes meeting just minutes from now. this hour, the u.s. ambassador to the united nations will muster all of her diplomatic skills and tiptoe through a political mine field. susan rice meets with republican senator john mccain. as you
today marched through cairo's tahrir square for the funeral of a man killed in protest against the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judiciary by banning anyone -- any authority, even the judiciary, from questioning, appealing any dec
. >> we know they are ongoing. israeli radio is saying an envoy was sent to cairo today. that person will meet up with envoys from the palestinian side, as well as representatives from qatar and egypt that will work on negotiating a cease fire. today you had prime minister netanyahu say as long as the rockets are landing in israel there will be no cease fire. his defense minister ehud barak said he expects the possibility of this conflict widening. that's a suggestion there could be some ground invasion in gaza at the very least. as you know, there are troops amassing in in the south of israel preparing for that ground invasion. although so far it seems like talks are ongoing ander in a period of trying to figure out if they can maintain a cease fire so the troops don't have to go in. >> it is a tense time is an under statement there. how long will these talks go underway? do you know? is there an outside that israel has indicated they will allow for them to try to negotiate and bargain before they may do military action? >> well, we did hear from the foreign minister in israel who s
because morsi hails from the brotherhood, a political cousin to hamas. we are joined from cairo. how are egyptians feeling about this cease-fire this morning? >> reporter: well, if you're the leadership of the muslim brotherhood in cairo you're patting yourself on the back today because they really came out looking very favorably in the international community throughout this process. this is a big test for egypt's government led now but the muslim brotherhood. a talk show host had a lot of concern. would this be a movement that would take up arms? would this be a movement that would give material support for hamas. it turns out that those fears, the way things stand right now turned out to be groundless. it looks like this is a government that's approached this very even handedly to keep their peace treaty and their economic alliances with washington and western capitals. in the end it doesn't look like this is a government that wanted to be seen as radical in the community. >>> back at home u.s. ambassador susan rice is speaking out about those talking points that she delivered on
and president mohamed morsi say discussions are under way in cairo and arab league foreign ministers are set to visit gaza on tuesday. violence has become a daily nightmare for people living in gaza. anderson cooper joins us now. take us to the ground and what's going on. what you seeing and hearing? >> it's about 2:00 a.m. here. we have heard a number of large explosions this evening. just a few in the last hour or so. this is generally the time when the strikes actually intensify. that's what we have seen over the last several nights. you can hear drones circling overhead, over gaza city as they have been since the conflict began. it's a constant sound, a constant reminder of the israeli forces watching the city. as you mentioned there was a strike. the israeli military said was a house owned by a hamas commander of an artillerary unit, initially, they said they killed that commander and then walked that back and said they couldn't be clear if he was at the house at the time. ten members of another family were staying at the house. they were all killed. our arwa damon was on the scene, saw
will arrive in cairo tomorrow. both israelis and palestinians say the solution must come from the other side. >> we are trying to drive home a message to hamas, that they cannot shoot at israeli civilians, try to kill israeli civilianes with impunity. we have been trying to keep down the amount of civilian deaths on their side. compare that to hamas on us. they are trying to maximize the amount of civilians that they kill. that's the different between a terrorist organization and democratic country. >> i think it takes two to tango here. the ambassador knows that israel invoked hamas by taking out one of their -- on wednesday. they knew that hamas and other fashions would retaliate. so they are also to be blamed for the violence between the gaza strip and israel. it's time for the united states, for international community, to force and pressure israel to lift the siege and that i believe will lead it putting an end to these facilities across the border. >> >>> president barack obama is in asia at this hour but not everyone is happy about his latest stop. the important political figure he is
to breaking news out of cairo, egypt. protesters are outraged at egyptian president mohamed morsi's power grab. thousands have gathered calling it the birth of a new pharaoh. attacking the headquarters of morsi's political party in alexandria and set it on fire according to egyptian tv. reza sayah joins us on the phone from tarir square. set the scene for us. reza, are you there? >> reporter: hello? >> reza, can you hear me? >> reporter: carol, i apologize. it is very loud here. i'm going to have a terribly difficult time hearing you. we are at tahrir square where thousands of people have come to protest against egyptian president mohamed morsi and there appears to be clashes between security forces and protest protesters in tahrir square. we just saw hundreds of people run i running away from security forces. we can report that tear gas has been shot in the air, we're assuming by security forces. it's remarkable here, carol, we're hear iing what we heard t years ago during revolution that toppled president mubarak, that people want to topple the regime. you're hearing it again, the anger and
egypt might go in all of this? >> i think egypt, look, it's quarter to a third of the arab world. cairo is one of the historical centers of the arab world. we don't have a good reading on where these guys are going, the muslim brotherhood. i'm not sure they necessarily do. we don't know how much to take literally what they say and write. they've got their internal politics, the party, the government. there's issues between them and other forces in egypt. they came into government fairly narrowly. but they're clearly trying to deepen their base. so everyone's watching really closely what they're doing with the rewriting of egypt's constitution, how these people want to consolidate power. what they say in the middle east, it's one thing to win an election. that's the easy part. are they willing to lose an election, to set up a political dynamic where there's a level playing field? i don't think we know the answer. >> whenever we're talking israel and hamas, you have to think about iran and its role. some of the long-range missile sites they bombed yesterday in those 50 strikes had bombs s
reports that it might have been related to that riot that broke out in cairo just before the attack regarding that anti-islamic film. there had been rioting in egypt and of course, this is the contradictory thread of the narrative here, that it was riots that -- in egypt that led to the attack on the embassy in libya on the consulate in libya. so he's going to talk about having these two threads of information but his sense right from the start that it was a terrorist attack by answar al sharia. a pretty murky group, loose collection of characters. >> this is interesting to me. just to be clear, your source is saying general petraeus knew almost immediately or felt that it was a terrorist attack, knew the group involved, even though he told members of congress three days after the attack that it could have been spontaneous and there's also the statement made by the director of national intelligence on the dni the end of october who put out a statement saying in the wake of criticism of ambassador rice, saying that early reports indicated it might have been linked to -- might have be
of state hillary clinton will travel to cairo and push for a
, in the hour and a half between the time the announcement was made in cairo and the cease-fire went into effect, we saw increasing numbers of israeli air strikes, artillery barrages into gaza city itself. some of them quite close to where i'm standing. and we saw three separate volley of rockets fired from gaza city toward israel. it did seem as if they were working against the clock to get just a few last whips in or hits in to the other side before the cease-fire went into effect. when it did go into effect, it became very calm, very quiet. then we started to hear celebratory gunfire coming from a bit of the distance from here. but it came closer and closer and we saw more and more cars out on the street. more than we've seen now for the last eight days for quite some time. there were very few cars out. definitely after dark, hardly any. but it went very quickly from pretty quiet to very noisy here in gaza city. >> can you talk about celebratory, some people celebrating that it's over and they could live their lives and they weren't afraid. others possibly celebrating they thought they scored
of the operations. >> thank you very much, fred. the arab league is holding an emergency session in cairo, ejiment, to discuss the gaza/israel conflict. they say the bloc should review the peace proposals to israel and its entire stance on the peace process in response to the conflict in gaza. >> protesters have taken to the streets in arab countries to show their solidarity to palestinians in gaza. tens of thousands of protesters filled the streets in egypt's capital. protesters in the nation of turkey set an israeli flag on fire, also a photo of benjamin netanyahu during a demonstration last evening. >>> president obama makes history this weekend with a three-nation tour of asia. the president is on his way to thailand right now, but it are rr the second leg of the trip that makes it historic, he's visiting myanmar. he wraps up his oversees trip in cambodia. he'll attend the east asia summit before returning to the united states on wednesday. >> rescue planes are still searching for two crew members missing after an oil rig exploding in the gulf of mexico. at least 11 people were injured in the
and protesters scuffled near cairo's tahrir square with arrests of young people many still upset by president mohamed morsi's move to consolidate his power. the muslim brotherhood is supporting nationwide rallies to support the president. the new constitution meantime says it has almost finished its final draft. and the e.p.a. is temporarily banning bp from competing for new government contracts. in the wake of the 2010 gulf oil spill, the agency says it is taking action because of bp's "lack of business integrity." as of february bp had $9 billion in contracts with the feds. bp it expects this ban to be lifted shortly. and the manager who oversaw apple's flawed maps program on its new iphone has been fired. rich williamson was fired just before the thanksgiving holiday. he had been with apple for about a decade. the flawed maps app forced ceo tim cook to issue a public apology after the iphone's debut in september. and if you've ever dreamed of an intimate dinner with betty white, well here is your chance. a los angeles chapter of the society for the prevention of cruel tito animals is aucti
. thousands of women hit the streets of cairo. the message they want washington to hear. aids affects us all. even babies. chevron is working to stop mother-to-child transmission. our employees and their families are part of the fight. and we're winning. at chevron nigeria, we haven't had a reported case in 12 years. aids is strong. aids is strong. but we are stronger. and aids... ♪ aids is going to lose. aids is going to lose. ♪ [ male announcer ] a european-inspired suspension, but it's not from germany. ♪ a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. ♪ it's a car like no other... from a place like nother. introducing the all-w 2013hevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ to get our adt security system. and one really big reason -- the house next door. our neighbor's house was broken into. luckily, her family wasn't there, but what if this happened here? what if our girls were home? and since we can't monitor everything 24/7, we got someone who could. adt. [ male announcer ] while some companies are new to home security, adt has been helping to save lives for ov
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